SCOUTS - Be Prepared

Radio Communicator

The Scout must complete all the requirements in one of the following alternatives.

Alternative A

  1. Complete the following three tasks:
    1. Log 25 different amateur radio stations showing details of date, time, call sign, frequency, readability and location. Some broadcast stations may be included.
    2. Show how to tune a simple communications receiver.
    3. Give an example of a typical 'greetings message'.
  2. Know the more commonly used HF and VHF amateur frequency bands and explain in simple terms how radio waves travel around the world.
  3. Complete the following two tasks:
    1. Know the international phonetic alphabet and define at least eight international Q code signals.
    2. Demonstrate their ability to recognise call signs from the UK and near continent.
  4. Visit an amateur radio station.
  5. Understand the regulations governing the use of amateur radio equipment.
Alternative B
  1. Send and receive a short message by Morse code or Semaphore at a rate of five words per minute.
  2. Demonstrate that they know a recognised procedure when sending and receiving a message.
  3. Know the international phonetic alphabet and define at least eight international Q code signals.
  4. Construct a simple Morse code oscillator and send a short message to the assessor.
Alternative C
  1. Complete the following three tasks:
    1. Log 25 different Citizens' Band users contacted showing details of date, time, identification, signal strength, readability and location.
    2. Discuss with the assessor their experiences in keeping the log, for example, use of equipment and effect of various conditions on range of reception.
    3. Demonstrate the use of Citizens' Band equipment by making a contact with another Citizens' Band user and maintaining the contact for at least two minutes.
  2. Discuss with the assessor the DTI recommended Code of Practice and the reasons for reserving certain channels for specific functions.
  3. Demonstrate a knowledge of the 'ten codes' used and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.
  4. Show a working knowledge of the conditions under which a DTI Citizens' Band Licence is issued, how suitable equipment may be recognised and the restrictions on its use. Show that all equipment used conforms to these regulations.
  5. Discuss with the assessor the cause of radio and television interference and the steps that might be taken to minimise the effects.
A Scout who holds the Radio Amateur Foundation Licence or the restricted Certificate of Competence in (Marine) Radio Telephony (VHF only) automatically qualifies for this Badge.