SCOUTS - Be Prepared

Mountain Activities

To atain the Mountain Activities badge, the Explorer Scout must complete the following:

Alternative A - Hill walking

- Choose one of the following two alternatives:

a) Hold the Scout Section Hill Walker Badge.

b) Have completed at least five one-day journeys of at least 14 kilometres.

- With others, take a major part in the planning and successful management of at least four one-day journeys, two of which must be in Terrain 2 areas. An authorised person may accompany all journeys. The expedition should include reference to appropriate clothing and equipment, route cards and conservation issues.

- With others, take a major part in the planning and management during at least one two-day expedition involving an overnight camp in wild country. An authorised person may accompany the expedition, but all decisions must be taken by the Explorer Scouts involved. The pre-planning must demonstrate a clear knowledge of the correct use of appropriate tents, stoves, sleeping bags and other equipment. The expedition should include reference to appropriate clothing and equipment, route cards and conservation issues.

- All the journeys and the expedition should have an aim in addition to that of completing the route. The expedition and the journeys can be linked to the requirements of the Chief Scout's, Queen's Scout and the Duke of Edinburgh's Awards. Reference should be made to Policy Organisation and Rules concerning Land Activities, Camping and Expeditions and Adventurous Activity Authorisation.

Alternative B - Climbing

- Choose one of the following alternatives:

a) Hold the Scout Section Climber Badge.

b) Have taken part in at least four different climbs. Know how to put on a harness and set up a belay. Know the calls used in rock climbing.

- Have experience of at least one two-hour session of single-pitch climbing on a man-made climbing wall, either indoors or outdoors.

- Be able to interpret a climbing guidebook and explain grading systems.

- Be able to select at least five separate climbs of a very difficult standard, find the starts on the ground and climb them. An experienced climber must supervise the climbs.

- Be able to abseil down a face of not less than 15 metres with a safety rope. There is no requirement for the Explorer Scout to lead the routes, although they may if they have enough experience.

Alternative C - Navigation

- Using a 1:25 000 scale Ordnance Survey map and compass, demonstrate an ability to micro-navigate a course of not less than six 'legs' to the standard of the Walking Group Leader Award.

- Using only a compass and pacing, successfully navigate a course of at least four 'legs' set by the examiner. - Using only a map, successfully navigate a course of at least four 'legs' set by the examiner.

- Produce two sketch maps, one in an urban setting and the other in the country, to enable someone else to travel between two points. - Successfully complete, in a reasonable time, at least three orienteering events or courses agreed with the examiner.

- Successfully complete a journey using a non-Ordnance Survey map, for example a Harvey map. - Complete a Scout Route plan for a route set by the examiner.

Alternative D - Caving

- Choose one of the following two alternatives:

a) Hold the Caver Badge from the Scout Section.

b) Have made at least four trips underground on two previous occasions to two different cave systems, as a member of a properly led party.

- Learn how caves are formed and be able to talk about them with the examiner. - Rig and use a ladder pitch under supervision.

- Undertake, as part of a properly led group, six different trips in at least two different cave systems. These trips must be different from, or extensions of, those logged for the Caver Badge. Three of these trips should include sections involving vertical pitches. Keep a record of these trips and the routes followed.

- Learn the caving and cave conservation codes. Be able to discuss with the examiner measures that can be taken by cavers to reduce conflict and promote conservation.

- Make a study on an aspect of speleology agreed with the examiner and discuss their findings. Examples of subjects to study include fauna and flora found in caves, cave photography or bat conservation. Caving and potholing are potentially dangerous pursuits. Scouts should only undertake this Badge if they can gain the necessary experience as a member of a properly organised caving group, run by experienced adult cavers, who will directly supervise any vertical pitches. Please refer to Policy, Organisation and Rules and the requirements for Adventurous Activity Authorisations.

Alternative E - Snowsports

- They must hold the Snowsports Badge from the Scout Section.

- They must be able to complete the requirements for this Badge, or show basic competency for the discipline they now wish to follow. They must complete all the requirements in their chosen discipline from the following: Alpine skiing, Nordic skiing or Snowboarding. Alpine skiing

- Demonstrate each of the following:

a) Three good warm-up exercises, one each for upper, middle and lower body.

b) Diagonal sideslip to left and right, showing balance and control of edges. c) Good stance and balance, for example, by lifting one ski while in motion.

d) A straight schuss in a tuck and a hockey stop.

e) Linked rhythmic parallel turns of varying sizes with pole plants. f) The ability to complete a slalom run through 12 open gates. g) An ability to ski on rough or bumpy terrain. h) A basic jump or trick on the flat. i) How to use a resort piste map. j) The ability to complete a free run down a moderate to hard or 'red' slope, showing balance, control, good choice of line and awareness of other people on the slope. k) An attempt at another snowsport of their choice. - Explain to the Assessor: a) What attracted them to the sport. b) The different types of ski design. c) What snow blindness is, and how it is avoided.

d) The importance of using sun screen. e) The physical dangers they are likely to encounter while skiing, and how these would be marked by the Ski Patrol.

f) The FIS Safety Rules.

 

- Discuss with the Assessor:

a) The effects of extremes of temperature, such as frost nip or frost bite, hypothermia, sunstroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Explain how they can be avoided and how they should be treated.

b) The structure of the National Governing Body for snowsport in their country.

c) The impact of snowsports on the mountain environment.

d) Their further involvement in your chosen snowsport. Nordic skiing

- Demonstrate each of the following:

a) Three good warm-up exercises, one each for upper, middle and lower body.

b) Double pole and stride.

c) Climbing uphill with tacking.

d) Diagonal sideslip to left and right.

e) Diagonal stride, full co-ordinated glide, stride and arm action.

f) Sittonen skate step.

g) Step turns downhill through the fall line.

h) Basic telemark turns.

i) Basic parallel turns.

j) Changing stride.

k) How to use a resort piste map.

l) Map and compass skills.

m) The ability to complete a free run down a moderate to hard or 'red' slope, showing balance, control, good choice of line and awareness of other people on the slope.

n) Take part in a fun run or citizens race of 5km or more.

o) An attempt at another snowsport of their choice.

 

- Explain to the Assessor:

a) What attracted them to the sport.

b) The different types of ski design.

c) What snow blindness is, and how is it avoided.

d) The importance of using sun screen.

e) The physical dangers they are likely to encounter while skiing and how these should be avoided.

f) The FIS Safety Rules.

- Discuss with the Assessor:

a) The effects of extremes of temperature, such as frost nip or frost bite, hypothermia, sunstroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Explain how they can be avoided and how they should be treated.

b) The structure of the National Governing Body for snowsport in their country.

c) The impact of snowsports on the mountain environment.

d) Their further involvement in their chosen snowsport. Snowboarding - Demonstrate each of the following:

a) Three good warm-up exercises, one each for upper, middle and lower body. b) Good stance and balance, for example, by boarding with arms folded.

c) A straight run with a hockey stop.

d) Linked rhythmic, carved turns of varying sizes.

e) Basic turns with the wrong foot forward or boarding backwards.

f) The ability to complete a slalom run through 12 open gates.

g) An ability to board on rough or bumpy terrain.

h) A basic jump or trick on the flat.

i) How to use a resort piste map.

j) The ability to complete a free run down a moderate to hard or 'red' slope showing balance, control, good choice of line and awareness of other people on the slope.

k) An attempt at another snowsport of their choice.

- Explain to the Assessor:

a) What attracted them to the sport.

b) The different types of board and boot design.

c) What snow blindness is and how it is avoided.

d) The importance of using sun screen.

e) The physical dangers they are likely to encounter while boarding and how these would be marked by the Ski Patrol.

f) The FIS Safety Rules.

- Discuss with the Assessor: The effects of extremes of temperature, such as frost nip or frost bite, hypothermia, sunstroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. Explain how they can be avoided and how they should be treated.

a) The structure of the National Governing Body for snowsport in their country.

b) The impact of snowsports on the mountain environment.

c) Their further involvement in thier chosen snowsport. ASSGB/BASI Three and Four Star qualify for the appropriate Alpine skiing, Nordic skiing or Snowboarding section. In France an equivalent level would be the ESF Two and Three Star. In Italy an equivalent level would be the Scuola Italiana di Sci Two and Three Star Silver.