SCOUTS - Be Prepared

Aviation Skills Training Options

Aviation Skills Training Options

Practical skills

- Build a solid fuel rocket and launch and recover it successfully.

- Build and fly a control-line model aircraft, making at least three circuits.

- Alone or with other Explorer Scouts, build and fly a radio-controlled model aircraft.

- Choose one of the following activities:

a) Build and fly an advanced kite design.

b) Fly a stunt kite to perform specific manoeuvres.

- Know the key design features of a major military or civil airfield and build a model to show these features.

- Build a diorama, which displays at least one scale aircraft model in a realistic setting.

- Research the history of Air Scouting and your own or a local Air Scout Group. Present your findings to a suitable interested group.

- Receive enough dual instruction to be able to fly a glider or light aircraft from take-off around a circuit and position for landing to the satisfaction of the accompanying qualified instructor. - From the air take a series of pictures or a video film of a particular location and identify the key features overflown.

- Achieve the Scout Paraglider Badge.

- Achieve one of the following Scout Instructor Badges: Aeronautics, Air Researcher, Air Spotter, Astronomer, Mechanic (Air), Model Maker (Air), Meteorologist, Navigator (Air).

- Qualify for Scout Wings for Flight Training.

- Qualify for Scout Wings for Canopy Training.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Flight safety and aviation skills

Research in detail the requirements of training for a Private Pilot's Licence. Provide details of a suitable flying school with costings and details of sponsorship schemes available.

- Explain the procedure for inter-airfield flights. Prepare a navigation plan or plog in draft for a pilot.

- Choose one of the following two activities:

a) Help as part of a Scout task force at an organised Air Display. b) Work as a member of a service team on an airfield on at least four occasions.

- Help a light aircraft pilot in his duties before and after a flight, for example, moving the aircraft, strapping in, starting up and picketing.

- Help a glider pilot with ground handling and launching his aircraft, and be able to assist after a field landing.

- Help a balloon pilot in his duties before and after a flight, for example, unpacking, inflating, and recovery after a flight.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Aircraft recognition and operations

- Identify 20 aircraft from pictures seen for not more than ten seconds each. The aircraft should be selected from the list published by Headquarters for this purpose.

- Identify 40 aircraft from pictures seen for not more than ten seconds each. The aircraft should be selected from the list published by Headquarters for this purpose.

- Identify the civil and military aircraft of at least ten countries by their national markings.

- Demonstrate knowledge of aircraft used in a particular military campaign since 1970; the main types of aircraft flown by each side and the weapons used.

- Discuss a particular air arm with an examiner and give examples of the aircraft used, its history and potential enemies.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Navigation

- Given track, groundspeed, course and airspeed, work out the type and amount of drift and establish the wind velocity.

- Demonstrate how the 1 in 60 rule is used for correcting track errors. Show how the distance marks and 5° or 10° lines may be used to correct estimated time of arrival and track errors.

- Illustrate by simple diagram how a fix can be obtained from two position lines. Describe briefly two ways in which bearings can be obtained in an aircraft so position lines can be drawn on a chart.

- Identify the main features of modern cockpit design and the meanings of terms such as HUDs and CRTs.

- Understand the main principles of satellite navigation systems.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Meteorology

- Identify the weather associated with frontal systems in the United Kingdom and be able to explain the meaning of the terms used in describing a weather map, such as col, ridge, trough and occlusion.

- Interpret a synoptic weather map or chart and identify at least two natural signs for weather changes in your area. Set up a simple weather station and keep a logbook of your recordings over a period of one month.

- Explain the effect on navigation of weather conditions, for example, drift, Buys Ballot's Law, air speed and altimeter errors, changes of wind directions and speed with height or at fronts.

- Explain the danger of icing to aircraft and the conditions that may result in icing.

- Explain the advantages of satellite images in modern meteorology.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Aero Engines

- Explain the effect of altitude on a piston engine, referring particularly to mixture control, carburettor icing and the use of hot air.

- Explain the purpose of variable pitch and constant-speed propellers.

- Discuss the theory of propeller design, including limits of blade size and speed, blade numbers and shape and contra-rotating props.

- Demonstrate a knowledge of the fuel systems used in space rockets or missiles and the means of control when outside the earth's atmosphere.

- Explain the desirable design features of a modern turbofan engine family and know their applications on different aircraft.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Communications and air traffic control

- Demonstrate the R/T procedure for a simple cross-country flight. Explain the distress procedure.

- Demonstrate knowledge of the main aircraft navigational aids and systems, with special reference to their use by private pilots.

- Explain the basic principles of radar and its uses in aviation.

- Explain the right of way rules for different types of aircraft. Explain collision avoidance rules for aircraft on converging or head on courses and when overtaking.

- Demonstrate knowledge of navigation lights, instrument flying conditions and the quadrantal height rule.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.

Principles of flight

- List the forces acting on a glider and explain how soaring flight is obtained, referring to thermals, wave lift and ridge lift.

- Demonstrate knowledge of the special problems of supersonic flight.

- Demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of helicopters and how they are controlled.

- Understand the principles of unstable aircraft (civil and military) and fly-by-wire control systems.

- Explain the main features of 'stealth' technology and its principle uses.

- One other activity of a similar nature and level of achievement as agreed by the Section leadership team.